AIS at MESA and ACLA

2018-2019

AMERICAN COMPARATIVE LITERATURE ASSOCIATION (ACLA) ANNUAL MEETING: GEORGETOWN UNIVERSITY 7-10 MARCH 2019

Prof. Elliott Colla presented “Contrapuntal Localism: Negm, Internationalism and Movement Poetry of the 1970s” as part of the Seminar: The Possibilities of Contrapuntal Criticism Today: Nations, Natives and Nativism.

Prof. Suzanne Stetkevych organized the Seminar: The Arabic Qasida: The Poetics and Politics of Performance, to which she contributed:

“Poetic Capital and the Metapoetics of Nostalgia: Yearning for the Homeland In al-Maʿarrī’s Lāmiyyah: (Saqṭ al-Zand 58)

PhD Candidate Cynthia Brandenburg contributed a Study of Jarīr; “Bāna al-khalītu; Lyrical Performances that Lull and Lance” to seminar organized by Professor Suzanne Stetkevych, The Arabic Qasida: The Poetics and Politics of Performance

Abstract:

Jarīr ibn ‘Aṭiyyah (c. 33/653-111/729), one of the famous triumvirate of Umayyad poets, is renowned for his satirical images and terrorizing invective but is often neglected in terms of the aesthetic beauty and sonority of his odes despite the oft-quoted epithet “who scoops from the sea”. Jarīr is most often tied to “the bad and the ugly” by contemporary critics and modern-day scholars but less so to the sublime. This paper is one attempt to redress this gap in the study of Jarīr’s poetic production through a detailed analysis of his ode entitled, The Tribe Departed.

In this 73-line1 nasīb-hija’ bi-partite nūniyyah poem composed in the basiṭ meter, Jarīr lulls the audience into a lyric ecstatic trance in the first 57 lines before the short but brutal end. While Jarīr may not always be recognized for his ghazal, we find that the amatory prelude includes exquisite examples of ghazal, a mark of Umayyad poetic excellence. This poetic seduction by Jarīr is so great that some contemporary audiences raise objections as to the gharaḍ of the poem, denying its invective force in favor of its seductive force.

The conversational style, song-like meter, and familiar images of love and betrayal of its nasīb make this ode a crowd-pleaser across the ages. As the unsuspecting audience is drawn in to the lyric beauty of this piece, they are not prepared for the visceral shock and humiliation by proxy of the target of the attack that ultimately renders its victim, al-Akhṭal, defeated. While Jarīr could draw on many invective weapons in his arsenal, it is ultimately caliphal power that Jarīr chooses to destroy his Christian rival, al-Akhṭal, court-poet to the caliph, ‘Abd al-Malik, staking his own claim to power and foiling his opponent’s claim.


MIDDLE EASTERN STUDIES ASSOCIATION (MESA) 15-18 NOV. 2018

The Department of Arabic and Islamic Studies is participating at the annual meeting for Middle Eastern Studies Association (MESA) in San Antonio, Texas Faculty members, students and alumni are panel organizers, presenters, chairs and discussants.  

Panel: Re-Opening the 1960s

      Elliott Colla, “Movement Poetry: Activism and Poetry Repertoires in Egypt, 1968-1977”
      When: Sunday, 11/18/18, 1:30 PM


2017-2018

MIDDLE EASTERN STUDIES ASSOCIATION (MESA) 18-21 NOV. 2017

The Department of Arabic and Islamic Studies is participating at the annual meeting for Middle Eastern Studies Association (MESA) in Washington D.C. Faculty members, students and alumni are panel organizers, presenters, chairs and discussants.  


2016-2017

MIDDLE EASTERN STUDIES ASSOCIATION (MESA) 17-20 NOV. 2016

The Department of Arabic and Islamic Studies is participating at the annual meeting for Middle Eastern Studies Association (MESA) in Boston. Faculty members, students and alumni are panel organizers, presenters, chairs and discussants.